Markets shrug at May’s Florence speech

Theresa May’s speech confirmed that the UK is seeking a transition period but gave few further details on the final shape of Brexit. Investors had hoped that Prime Minister Theresa May’s Florence speech would be the factor that pushed Brexit negotiations forward. However, the speech was a slightly softer version of her Lancaster House speech … Continue reading “Markets shrug at May’s Florence speech”

Brexit, North Korea and Hurricane Harvey

August is the holiday month and with many key decision makers, in particular, the politicians, away from their desks, it’s normal for things to be a little quieter. Theresa May, for example, took a three-week break for some walking in the Swiss Alps, presumably with the ‘Sound of Music’ on her iPod and ‘Climb Every … Continue reading “Brexit, North Korea and Hurricane Harvey”

How to invest in times of political change

The last few years have thrown up a series of political surprises. Rank outsiders overturning the odds have become so normal that equity markets have learnt to brace for impact and as a result, those impacts have become more muted. Political leaders and commentators appear to have accepted that old rules may not hold even … Continue reading “How to invest in times of political change”

Could politics structurally alter the economic backdrop?

With 5 July having marked ten years since the Bank of England (BoE) last raised UK interest rates, we assess the state of the economy and its prospects in light of recent political developments. Although the UK economy has shown resilience since last year’s Brexit referendum, its growth rate decelerated in the first quarter of … Continue reading “Could politics structurally alter the economic backdrop?”

Brexit: One year on

On the first anniversary of the historic vote to leave the European Union, a panel of Schroders’ experts look at the impact the referendum has had on the UK from an economic, fixed income and equity perspective.  When the result of the UK’s EU referendum confirmed that the UK had voted to leave, markets were … Continue reading “Brexit: One year on”

UK election: what a hung parliament means for markets

Following the surprise UK general election result, Schroders’ Alix Stewart,  David Docherty & Azad Zangana, consider the implications for the economy and markets.   The UK general election has resulted in a hung parliament, with no party commanding an overall majority. The Conservatives have emerged as the largest party and will likely seek to form … Continue reading “UK election: what a hung parliament means for markets”

The Times They Are A Changin’…

It was a strange month for global stockmarkets, as March proved not too dissimilar to February in its outcome. With the exception of the US and Japan, which generally moved sideways, most equity markets moved higher. However, this was also echoed by government bond markets, with yields narrowing as investor ebullience over the Trump-driven reflation … Continue reading “The Times They Are A Changin’…”

Theresa May announces UK general election

This morning, UK Prime Minister Theresa May announced the government’s intention to hold a snap general election on 8 June 2017. Parliament will vote to set a date for the election tomorrow, needing a supermajority of two-thirds in favour to pass, although this is expected with the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn having already welcomed the … Continue reading “Theresa May announces UK general election”

Is populism good for markets?

Populist policies appear good for markets, given the performance of equities following the Brexit and Donald Trump votes. However, we would note that the conditions for a rally (dovish signals from the Federal Reserve (Fed) and signs of a global recovery) were already falling into place last summer, before either of these two events took … Continue reading “Is populism good for markets?”

No Brexit plan – but a clearer destination

Theresa May has given much more detail than previously on what the UK’s negotiating objectives will be when it starts on the road out of the European Union (EU). The speech did not answer all the questions that Britain’s business community and trading partners might have, or remove all of the uncertainties hanging over Britain’s … Continue reading “No Brexit plan – but a clearer destination”

Sterling and US politics take centre stage in October

Sterling endured a torrid October against a backdrop of ongoing uncertainties surrounding the UK’s Brexit plans. The pound fell against the US dollar to reach its lowest level for over 30 years during the month, and against the euro to reach its lowest level since 2011. During October, Prime Minister Theresa May confirmed that she … Continue reading “Sterling and US politics take centre stage in October”

Gilt yields surged during October

UK gilt yields surged and prices fell in October amid waning demand for sterling-denominated assets. During October, the pound reached its lowest level against the euro since 2011 and its lowest level against the US dollar for over thirty years. Nevertheless, despite the ongoing weakness in the pound, the UK’s trade deficit widened during August: … Continue reading “Gilt yields surged during October”

Sterling remained under pressure in October

Sterling remained under pressure in October amid ongoing nervousness about the UK’s Brexit strategy. The pound reached its lowest level against the US dollar for thirty years and its lowest level against the euro since 2011. During the month, Prime Minister Theresa May confirmed that she intends to invoke Article 50 and start the process … Continue reading “Sterling remained under pressure in October”

Sterling work…

With sterling having just plunged to a 31-year low against the US dollar, it’s interesting to note some of the similarities between the UK now and back in 1985. We had a female prime minister at the helm (Margaret Thatcher), while rival political factions vied to take control of the UK’s Labour Party (Neil Kinnock … Continue reading “Sterling work…”