Avoiding a corporate bond liquidity squeeze

Since the global financial crisis in 2008, aging developed-world populations, record low deposit interest rates and quantitative easing by the world’s major central banks have driven a global ‘search for yield’ by investors. For many years, this drove asset yields lower across the risk spectrum. However, since the start of 2018 the investment backdrop has … Continue reading “Avoiding a corporate bond liquidity squeeze”

Will the world authorities do enough to stimulate their economies?

Markets signalled the slowdown now underway in industrial output and investment with a sharp sell-off at the end of last year. They challenged the Federal Reserve in particular to ease its tough stance, which it duly did as 2019 dawned. US policy is to spend more and tax less, offering some budget boost to the … Continue reading “Will the world authorities do enough to stimulate their economies?”

China tries to balance its economy

The Chinese bear market in shares has lasted since the peaks reached in the summer of 2015. The index of share prices for the Shanghai market has halved since June 2015. Then excessive exuberance tempted many domestic buyers into the stock market. A substantial credit expansion allowed people to buy shares on borrowed money. When … Continue reading “China tries to balance its economy”

A slowdown in the world economy worries markets

Japanese interest rates are negative, Euro-area rates are still at zero, the UK official short-rate is at 0.75% and in the US at 2.25%. The Japanese are still running a quantitative easing programme, printing money to buy up state debt, and the Euro-area is doing a little bit more of the same until the end … Continue reading “A slowdown in the world economy worries markets”

Inflation and capacity

There is a danger that central banks will tighten too much. Part of the market plunge during October was a response to tougher money conditions around the world. The Federal Reserve in the US is well advanced with a programme of rate rises. At the same time, it is supervising the rundown of its portfolio … Continue reading “Inflation and capacity”

The forgotten bear market in China

In the summer of 2015, the Chinese authorities overdid their enthusiasm for wider share ownership. With their general encouragement, brokers advanced large sums to individuals to buy shares. A buying frenzy developed in the markets and the Shanghai index hit a new high of 5,166 in June. The government decided things were getting out of … Continue reading “The forgotten bear market in China”

EU caught up in internal war of words

The President of the EU Commission had some choice words to say about the Italian budget dispute. Jean-Claude Juncker argues that Italy has to keep to strict budget limits on spending and borrowing that has been laid down by the EU. He went so far as to suggest it would mean the end of the … Continue reading “EU caught up in internal war of words”

Trade and banking matters hit China

The Chinese economy is one of the two giant economies in the global market. We have got used to relying on China to produce growth of more than 6%, and to supply a wide range of manufactured items at attractive prices. The combined effects of a huge expansion of Chinese manufacturing capacity, and the digital … Continue reading “Trade and banking matters hit China”

Europe’s struggle to break free

At the start of 2018, it looked likely that interest rates could start to rise across Europe, signalling the end of the necessary post-crisis readjustment in the financial sector. However, as is often the case, the themes that drive markets at the start of the year can often be forgotten by the end. As 2018 … Continue reading “Europe’s struggle to break free”

Turkey: an idiosyncratic problem or a threat to wider emerging markets?

Turkey has seen a temporary resolution to its current crisis with the injection of $15bn of Qatari cash, but it is still in crisis. The Qatar offer, from Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani, is designed to help the country ride out its currency crisis, which has seen the lira plunge. However, it is a short-term … Continue reading “Turkey: an idiosyncratic problem or a threat to wider emerging markets?”

Globalisation – Nothing new under the sun

There is nothing new about geopolitics. Geography – both physical and human – has influenced politics and international relations for centuries, even millennia. But the nature of geopolitical risk has changed over time. During the Cold War, geopolitical risks for Western governments and the corporate world were focused on Moscow’s motivations and behaviour, the possibility … Continue reading “Globalisation – Nothing new under the sun”

It’s Oh So Quiet…

Here are the key factors that Whitechurch Securities believe have influenced investment markets in recent weeks. Markets rose early in June only to fall back towards the end of the month as Central bankers took the limelight from politicians and investors moved into more of a risk-off mode. The Federal Reserve spooked investors with fears … Continue reading “It’s Oh So Quiet…”

Down But Not Out

February started where January left off – providing investors with a timely reminder that global markets fall quicker than they rise. Strong US employment numbers and evidence of wage growth fuelled investor concerns over inflation and the prospect of a more aggressive US interest rate cycle. This led to a sharp sell-off in equity markets … Continue reading “Down But Not Out”

What does a normal interest rate look like?

Markets have been worried that interest rates in the west are heading back to normal in a hurry. If rates go too high too soon they could damage the recovery and do more harm to shares. As the West agonises over the pace of putting up interest rates and winding down special monetary measures, the … Continue reading “What does a normal interest rate look like?”