The US budget should help economic growth

The Trump administration White House has set out its preferred budget for 2019. It is likely the House and Senate will wish to tone down its dramatic proposals. The President’s wish is to boost military and veterans expenditure substantially, whilst cutting back hard on various other departments and programmes. A 13% increase in defence is … Continue reading “The US budget should help economic growth”

A weak dollar is a tailwind for global growth

The 10% depreciation of the trade-weighted US dollar over the past year is an underappreciated driver of the synchronised upswing in world trade and global economic growth. That’s because movements in the US dollar have global consequences above and beyond movements in any other currency – dollar appreciation tends to crimp global trade and credit … Continue reading “A weak dollar is a tailwind for global growth”

One year of Trump

January 20th marked Donald Trump’s one-year anniversary as US President.  So far, his tenure has proved controversial and divisive, both domestically and abroad. His attempts to take credit for the performance of the US economy and equity market should be taken with a pinch of salt, particularly given the considerable momentum carried over from his … Continue reading “One year of Trump”

How do you say déjà vu in Spanish?

Actions will speak louder than the words for Latin America’s populists in 2018. Nearly two out of three Latin Americans will choose a new leader over the next 12 months. Chile and Honduras have kicked off the year-long cycle. Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Paraguay and possibly Venezuela will follow next year. Observers are worried … Continue reading “How do you say déjà vu in Spanish?”

Can European politics damage the euro?

It is often fashionable to worry about European politics as newer parties of the right, left and centre emerge to challenge the economic orthodoxy of the Eurozone. We saw this at its most spectacular in Greece, where Syriza swept aside the old parties and gained a majority in a proportional system designed to make that … Continue reading “Can European politics damage the euro?”

Outlook 2018: Another good year for investors?

As investors look ahead to a new year, they could be forgiven for wondering whether they will be as pleasantly surprised in 2018 as they were in 2017. A number of political worries on the horizon this time last year signally failed to materialise, including the likely shape of President Trump’s trade policies, the rise … Continue reading “Outlook 2018: Another good year for investors?”

Signal or noise? Political risk in 2018

Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Terrorism. Populism. A newly emboldened Russia. The world is an unsettled place, but financial markets are relatively calm. A few factors could yet jolt them. US equity markets have generated significant gains over the last year, despite the headlines speculating over possible Russian interference in the US presidential election, … Continue reading “Signal or noise? Political risk in 2018”

Turbulence ahead: Politics is never far from the surface

November was a lacklustre month in terms of stock market returns. Japan and the US led the way with rises of 1.14% and 1.06% respectively, which resulted in the FTSE World index managing a rise of just 0.7%. Closer to home the FTSE All Share fell by 1.66%, as did Europe and Emerging markets which … Continue reading “Turbulence ahead: Politics is never far from the surface”

Be careful counting your chickens

Hopes are high for the OPEC meeting on 30 November. A programme of cuts to supply that was initiated last year by OPEC and some non-OPEC members (we’ll refer to the two collectively as ‘OPEC/NOPEC’) has resulted in the oil price steadily rising from its lows to just short of $60 a barrel at the … Continue reading “Be careful counting your chickens”

Germany shows there is still political risk in the Eurozone

When the Netherlands kept Mr Wilders out of power and Mr Macron swept into office in France, the immediate threats to the Euro disappeared. The recent collapse of coalition talks in Germany does not presage any undermining of majority support for the single currency in its heartland. The next major political issue facing the Euro … Continue reading “Germany shows there is still political risk in the Eurozone”

Trump – one year on

A year on from Donald Trump’s election as US president, political and economic pundits are grappling with a big question: what is the significance of Trump? Is his presidency a boorish blip or a symptom of deeper malaise? Before Trump’s election, markets were fearful about the ‘bad things’ that he promised – American isolationism and … Continue reading “Trump – one year on”

You didn’t think European political risk was over, did you?

The crisis in Catalonia probably won’t derail the Eurozone recovery. But there are more political challenges ahead. Markets have largely shrugged off events in Catalonia. They are probably correct to do so. After all, Catalonia is unlikely to become independent, at least for the foreseeable future. There does not appear to be a majority in … Continue reading “You didn’t think European political risk was over, did you?”

Jay Powell nominated as next Fed Chair

President Trump has nominated Jay Powell as the next Chair of the US Federal Reserve. This was largely expected, despite Trump’s hosting of a somewhat convoluted selection process (involving a promotional video), which saw numerous candidates briefly take the role of favourite. The official changing of the guard occurs at the start of February next … Continue reading “Jay Powell nominated as next Fed Chair”

Eurozone: Political risk still simmering

The major political obstacles, which had held back European risk assets, have now been overcome. However, events in Austria, Spain and Italy highlight the ongoing trend towards populist, nationalist and now regionalist sentiment. In Austria, although the far right Freedom Party (FPÖ) was recently defeated in elections for the legislative parliament, it could enter government … Continue reading “Eurozone: Political risk still simmering”

The politics of identity stalk European markets

Earlier this year investors worried that the euro was under threat. Its very future in the Netherlands and in France was on the ballot paper. As many of us expected, the euro survived its brush with democracy. In the Netherlands the anti-euro party topped the poll, but well short of the seats needed to govern … Continue reading “The politics of identity stalk European markets”